May 2018


Message from the President

Aloha Hawaii Craftsmen Members,

Whew, was April a busy month. 

Thanks everyone for making the public presentation and workshops for Aha Hana Lima 2018 featuring Japanese furniture maker Tak Yoshino a success. On behalf of the board, I would like to especially thank Tusha Buntin and the staff at the Robin Buntin Gallery for the loan of Tak’s work for the Oahu Public presentation (you guys can check it out at the gallery). I would like to thank Francisco Clemente whose guidance and knowledge of the woodworking and the local community and introduction to Tak proved to be invaluable. I would like to thank Page Chang and Toni Palermo for the reception at the Honolulu public presentation and Kristen Shiga and the staff at the Donkey Mill Art Center on the Big island for hosting Tak’s public presentation and a wonderful potluck. I would like send a big mahalo out to Tai Lake for hosting the workshop in his fabulous studio on the Big Island.

Thanks also to everyone for making Hawaii Craftsmen’s first online auction “inFormable Feast” a success. There was some great artwork by many of Hawaii’s master craftsmen for sale. A deep mahalo to all of you who participated in the bidding we couldn’t have done it with out you. Although we fell short of our goal we did manage to get more than half way there and raise a bit of dough for the organization, not a bad first time effort. I am looking forward to “inFormable Feast” as it matures into a regular event for us and developing other events like it to create a steady revenue stream for Hawaii Craftsmen. Special thanks to everyone who helped on the all volunteer team who devoted countless hours to developing this project especially Kim Isaak and Deanna Gabiga who spearheaded and developed this event.

Hawaii Craftsmen is working on a fall Aha event featuring Beth Cavener and her husband Allesandro Gallo in the Fall of 2018. This one is will be on three islands instead of two, with three day workshops on Oahu and Maui, and a five day workshop on the Big Island. To help fund this project we applied for and received a competitive grant from the Laila Twigg-Smith Fund of the Hawaii Community Foundation. Because of the magnitude of this workshop I am looking for volunteers on the three islands to help with coordinating this event. I am also looking for a co-chair for the program. If you are curious about this opportunity please email me at president@hawaiicraftsmen.org.

Keep an eye out for the Fiber Show prospectus. The event will be happening in late August and Tom Klobe has agreed to be the juror for the show. Tom will be giving a walk through lecture of the exhibit before the opening and will also give a lecture on the importance of collaboration later in the month. Intake is scheduled for August 20th with jurying happening on August 21st. Installation will follow on August 22nd through August 23rd with the opening reception happening on August 24th. Exhibit will be open from August 25th through September 9th. Mark your calendars, these shows take a huge amount of work to mount, one of the ways that you can support Hawaii Craftsmen and our programs is to volunteer.

Aloha

Mark Mitsuda
President Hawaii Craftsmen
president@hawaiicraftsmen.org

InFORMable Feast

WOW! That was fun! The online auction is over! Check out the quick video we prepared that shares the sold items. Mahalo to all the artists who provided a great variety of items for the auction. And Mahalo Nui Loa to those who purchased and donated.

Thirty-eight artist donated 88 items valued at $31,392 and we sold 36 items for $5,745.00 - 40% of donated items sold. Eighty percent of the items donated were valued at under $500 and we did not sell anything over $525.00. Artists were given the option to donate 50% or 100%. Again, 80% of the artists opted for the 50% donation and we will be paying 26 artists $1,955 for their portion. Big shout out to those who donated 100%! We had 46 registered participants and about 35 of them were active bidders and 25 were winning bidders. Sixteen items were purchased at the Buy Now Price. We also received some donations on the auction site and on Facebook. Our expenses were low and only included payment to auction site, social media ads and financial processing fees. Including the donations Hawaii Craftsmen will net close to $3,600.

A big part of this effort was promoting the online auction site and the dates that the auction was open for preview and then open for bidding. We doubled down on our email blasts and social media posts. Did you notice? 32Auctions analytics showed 4,965 page views. And our efforts on Facebook and Instagram reached over 7,000 people across the country. We are still in the analysis phase to see if the effort was well targeted. Thank you everyone who helped spread the word - including our volunteer social media team - their posts were well written and interesting. Regardless of the numbers our gut tells us we did a good job getting the word out.

This was a first time effort and we will be sending an online eval form to those who directly participated. However, we need to hear from you all to determine if this was truly a successful event. Please send your comments to Kim at kimcoffeeisaak@gmail.com.

Hawaii Craftsmen members and board need to raise $30,000 this year to cover our basic overhead expenses. These include insurance, rent, communications applications fees, grant writing, bookkeeping and office management. Our program budgets are designed to break even while they contribute to 30% of the overhead; membership dues will cover another 30%. That leaves 40% or $12,000 to raise with donor contributions and special fundraising events. This “non” event is a good start to the goal; thank you for helping; stand by for more!

Aloha, Kim


'Aha Hana Lima 2018 : Tak Yoshino

Japanese furniture maker Tak Yoshino’s Aha Hana Lima workshop proved to be immensely rewarding for both the attendees of the public presentations and the workshops. Oahu participants in the public presentation were treated to actual pieces of Tak’s furniture supplied by Tusha Buntin of the Robin Buntin Gallery in Honolulu. No image can replace the real thing and Tak’s chairs proved to be as stunningly pleasurable to sit in as they are to look at. At both public presentations Tak had examples of the types of joinery that he uses in his work as well as the tools he uses to create the work. In addition to being a prolific furniture maker, I was pleasantly surprised to find that he is starting an international Japanese woodworking school at the foot of Mount Fuji and invited anyone to come out and help him build it (I think I may just take him up on that).

I had the pleasure of attending both of the workshops and the attendees were treated to a thorough explanation and experience in sharpening and using the Kanna. I was amazed at it’s ability to both cut and create a final finish on both soft woods like poplar and more challenging woods like curly Koa. It even cuts and finishes the end grain. The students demonstrated the flexibility of this little hand plane in shaping finished objects both sculptural and more utilitarian like spoons, spatulas. One of the students on Oahu used this hand plane to finish the inside curves of a Taiko Drum that had previously been a challenge using modern power tools. Just about all of the attendees left the workshop with their own customized Kanna (some with more than one) and set of sharpening stones.

In addition to training on the setup, personalization, and use of the Kanna, Tak also went over an introduction to Japanese joinery. Though similar (I am told) to western joinery, the layout tools were a little different to their western counterparts and are specialized to really make a difference in the precision of the joints. Students in both workshops were challenged in laying out the patterns for the cuts and using a Japanese pull saw. On the Big Island the advanced students worked on some of the more advanced joints including a three part 45 degree hidden joint (check out the photos!).



Workshops, Events & Opportunities


HAWAII VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK
 JULY ARTISTS IN RESIDENCE

DEADLINE EXTENDED 
'til Friday, May 4th

OUR NEXT RESIDENCY IS FOR THE MONTH OF JULY of 2018 IN HAWAII as the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Artist in Residence. Spend part of your summer in the land of the Island Kings! This residency is one of the most unique & best Artist in Residence opportunities ever offered. Includes $2000 Stipend.

We have been granted the unique opportunity to NOW invite FAMILIES, ARTIST TROUPES, COLLABORATIONS, SOLO ARTISTS and ANY COMBINATION OF THESE. The selected artist(s) will be inspired by HAWAII VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK and Hawaii island, given $2000 stipend and a full 3 bedroom, 3 full bath home, with all modern amenities.  

MORE INFORMATION



CERAMICS: DRAMATIC VESSELS WITH CAROL ZEE

MAY 19th - 20th 2018
DONKEY MILL ART CENTER
78-6670 MAMALAHOA HWY
HOLUALOA, HI 96725




Description:  In this weekend workshop, artist Carol Zee will guide you through the unique construction process she has developed over years of exploration. Using variations on handbuilding techniques, students will design and build a vase that is a study in the limitless variations of composition defined by this construction process and technique. Each vase will be unique, and dramatically different from any other vase in the world!

Your vase will be fired and glazed by Donkey Mill and will be ready to be picked up within a month after the workshop. 

MORE INFORMATION

HAWAII ISLAND ART ALLIANCE


CALL TO ARTISTS! QUILTS IN THE FOREST – WHERE THE PATH MIGHT LEAD


TRADTIONAL, CONTEMPORARY AND INNOVATIVE QUILTS 

JULY 13 – AUGUST 4, 2018
VOLCANO ART CENTER NI‘AULANI CAMPUS

19-4074 OLD VOLCANO RD, VOLCANO, HI 96785


Please see the official Quilt Show rules here.

Register online here!

Volcano Art Center invites all quilters from the island of Hawai‘i to participate in the second bi-annual quilt show Quilts in the Forest- Where the Path May Lead. This quilt exhibit will be on display from July 13, 2018 through August 4, 2018 at Volcano Art Center’s Hale Ho‘omana at the Ni‘aulani Campus in Volcano Village.


MOTHER’S DAY CERAMICS + GLASS SALE 2018

MAY 4TH - 8TH, 10am - 4pm
UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII ART BUILDING
2535 McCARTHY MALL, RM 142,
HONOLULU, HI 96822


The annual Mother’s Day Ceramic + Glass Sale features great gifts for your mother, grandmother, aunt, or grad! Check off your gift list and support the art students and the Department of Art + Art History.

Directions + where to park
Parking fees may apply.

For more information contact Professor Rick Mills at rlmills@hawaii.eduor 808-956-5258


“HAWAII CRAFTSMEN CELEBRATES FINE CRAFT AS A VITAL AND ENRICHING PART OF CONTEMPORARY LIFE AND SUPPORTS THE CREATIVE GROWTH OF OUR MEMBER ARTISTS AND THE EDUCATION OF THE GENERAL PUBLIC TO THE VALUE OF THE CRAFTS.” 

Exhibitions


10X10X10WAILOA CENTER
200 PIOPIO STREET
HILO, HAWAII
96720



ART IN TIME! HAWAII STATE ART MUSEUM
250 SOUTH HOTEL ST, SECOND FLOOR
HONOLULU, HI 96813


  • Join us for First Friday May 4th for the exciting opening of ArtInTime! Over 50 invited artists gave their imaginations free reign in transforming identical small metal boxes into singular expressions of creativity. ArtInTime was conceived by Keiko Hatano and KJ Baysa in collaboration with Lisa Shiroma. All of the artists have designated a portion of their sales to the Jay Jensen Contemporary Art Acquisitions Fund at the Honolulu Museum of Art. The highly anticipated Hawaii Master Artists Show benefit sale for the Friends of Hawaii State Art Museum will be happening the same night in the Artizen by MW cafe space. Valet parking on Richards Street for $4. Free and open to the public!


ALOHA HO‘OMALUHIA XXXIV

HO'OMALUHIA BOTANICAL GARDEN
45-680 LULUKU RD
KANEOHE, HI 96744




THE RIPPLE EFFECT

MAY 03, 2018 - SEPTEMBER 30, 2018 
HONOLULU MUSEUM OF ART
900 S BERETANIA ST
HONOLULU, HI 96814



Woman’s Kimono (left)
Japan, Second Quarter 20th Century
Silk, crepe weave, stencil-printed warp and hand-tie-dyed weft kasuri (ikat)
Purchase, 1998  (8922.1)

Woman’s Kimono (right)
Japan, Second Quarter 20th Century
Silk, plain weave, stencil-printed warp and hand-tie-dyed weft kasuri (ikat)
Purchase, 1999  (9070.1)

Exhibition Overview

This exhibition is part of the museum's observance of the 150th anniversary of the arrival of Japanese—gannemono (first-year-folks)—in Hawai‘i.

As an island nation surrounded by the sea, Japan reveres water. Japanese textiles featuring water motifs—such as ponds, rivers, whirlpools, waterfalls and waves—are popular and prevalent. In Japanese culture, this primary force of nature represents the passage of time as an endless flow—one that is fluid, flexible and resilient as well as sacred and pure. Interpretations vary from naturalistic renderings to stylized abstractions, marking a single moment in this eternal rhythm, as a reminder that all things are in a state of flux.

In this exhibition of luxurious kimono, garments and textile fragments, you can see that water is more than a graphic element—many motifs are named, linking them to cultural values charged with hidden meanings. Woven, dyed and embroidered renderings include large powerful crested waves, kata-onami,which denote vitality; koi swimming upstream, which are associated with strength and perseverance; and swirls of water, or Kanze mizu, named after the Kanze family of Noh actors, which are a conventional treatment of flowing water. Concentric circles form arches that resemble overlapping waves known as seigaiha, or “blue sea wave,” signifying auspicious surges of good luck, are preserved on an 18th-century fragment and echoed in a 20th-century kimono. Originally found on ancient Chinese maps as a marking for the ocean, this emblem can be construed as a device to promote peace, analogous to one provided by a calm sea.

Landscapes inform a sense of place as maple leaves gently floating downstream, turning the water red, bring to mind the Tatsuta River. Alluding to fall’s melancholy seasonal change, this references a poem by the legendary poet Ariwara no Narihira (825-880). Dragonflies start their life in water and are abundant in summer and autumn, so paired water and dragonfly motifs are commonly found on women’s summer kimono, three of which will be on view. Because dragonflies can only fly forward, they also signify agility and authority and the name, tombo, meaning “victory insect,” was linked to samurai strength and bravery.

INTERSECTIONS:
CONSIDERING IMBALANCE |  MAY 10 ­– JUNE 30, 2018

KAHILU THEATRE FOUNDATION
67-1186 LINDESY RD.

KAMUELA, HI 
96743


We are pleased to announce that Andi Campognone will be our Exhibition Juror. Andi is the Museum Manager/Curator at the Lancaster Museum of Art and History (MOAH), in Lancaster, California. 

In a world that seems increasingly polarized, we often find ourselves at metaphorical intersections where a range of forces—cultural, political,economic, emotional—converge. Achieving individual or collective balance when these forces meet and mix may first require disturbances or expressions of resistance. Artists often take a significant role in public discourse when their work is driven by these intersections.

In this exhibition, we invite artists to examine the idea of an intersection as not simply where two or more lines meet—a site that you approach, choose a direction, and then continue on—but as a starting place to consider the imbalance of the status quo.



SELF ASSEMBLY: CERAMICS BY CHRISTOPHER EDWARDS

MARCH 22 – JUNE 15, 2018
HONOLULU MUSEUM OF ART
FIRST HAWAIIAN CENTER
999 BISHOP STREET


Christopher Edwards’ ceramic works are inspired by the underlying algorithmic logic of biology and mathematics. The exhibition title refers to the process of self-assembly in nature, by which small, individual components spontaneously assemble themselves into a larger organized system. Visual references in his works include Islamic art and architecture, telescopes on Mauna Kea, Polynesian tattoo motifs, star charts, and wave maps.


#94, Cnidaria, 9" x 50" x 16”, 2017 Raku-fired ceramic

INTIMATE ORBITS: C. B. FORSYTHE AND JUVANA SOLIVEN

MARCH 22 – JUNE 15, 2018
HONOLULU MUSEUM OF ART
FIRST HAWAIIAN CENTER
999 BISHOP STREET

Using materials such as fabric, buttons, beeswax, leather, and fur, artists C.B. Forsythe and Juvana Soliven make carefully constructed mixed-media works that evoke family and the home. The work of both artists speak to the complexities of human connectivity, emotional intimacy, yearning, and nostalgia.


WĀ MA MUA / WĀ MA HOPE: NAVIGATING THE FUTURE WITH THE PAST
Hōkūleʻa and the Mālama Honua Movement
APRIL 14TH - JUNE 23RD 2018
DONKEY MILL ART CENTER
78-6670 MAMALAHOA HWY
HOLUALOA, HI 96725



Exhibition Tour with Guest Curator Mina Elison on June 9 from 1:00pm - 1:30pm (Free and open to the public)

Guest Curator: Mina Elison under the guidance of Gary Eoff, DMAC Cultural Advisor Kumu Keala Ching, and DMAC Artistic Advisor Hiroki Morinoue.

Featured items provided and crafted by Gary Eoff, Cliff Johns, Ed Kaneko, and David Reisland.

“By rediscovering the traditional practices and skills of our ancestors, we protect the land and ocean resources for our future.” Gary Eoff

In the Hawaiian language, “ka wā ma mua” describes “the time which has gone before” or “the past.” Presented within the context of traditional Hawaiian values in the form of five proverbs, this thoughtful exhibition demonstrates the sustainable practices and beliefs of kūpuna and challenges the viewer’s perception of what the future can be. 

Several installations make up this exhibition, which includes a curated collection of contemporary art produced with traditional techniques of kūpuna (ancestors) i ka wā ma mua (of the past). Handcrafted items, each with a distinct sustainable function and use, are presented alongside their contemporary counterparts. The viewer is invited to then see the “future” through the lens of traditional objects and practices. 

The final installation featuring the story of the Polynesian voyaging canoe, Hōkūleʻa and the Mālama Hōnua Worldwide Voyage inspires exhibit visitors to appreciate how we are all connected and challenges us to be more conscious of the effects of our actions on ourselves, others and the earth.

Theme 1:      
He waʻa he moku, he moku he waʻa.
The canoe is an island, and the island is a canoe.

Theme 2:    
He aliʻi ka ʻāina; he kauwā ke kanaka. [531]
The land is a chief; man is the servant.

Theme 3:      
E ʻai i kekāhi, e kāpī kekahi. [252]
Eat some, salt some.

Theme 4:     
I ka nānā no a ‘ike. [1186]
By observing one learns.

Theme 5:      
Ana Nānā Ka Ua
The rain is observed or measured.



ELEMENTAL DESIGN: CONTEMPORARY CRAFT IN GLASS, METAL & WOOD

APRIL 27th - FRIDAY 15th 2018
HUI NO‘EAU
2841 BALDWIN AVE
MAKAWAO, HI 96768


This dynamic exhibition showcases Hawai‘i artists working in glass, metal, and wood, challenging artists to explore these versatile media in all of their creative forms.

Hui No‘eau is thrilled to welcome Rick Mills, Professor & Glass Area Chair at the University of Hawai‘i, as our juror!


Members, do we have your Current Information ?

We are making sure that we have all members' current contact information to keep everyone informed and up to date on Hawaii Craftsmen events and opportunities. We are also tracking members' preferred art medium to help us make decisions about what programs to provide. Please take the time to sign in at Hawaiicraftsmen.org, update your contact information, and adjust your membership level or status as needed, so we can serve you better!

Support Hawaiʻi Craftsmen Today

For 50 years, Hawaiʻi Craftsmen has relied on the generosity of members, supporters, and volunteers like you, who have helped us accomplish our mission to serve as an integral part of the fine craft community, promote fine crafts throughout the state, and support our community of member artists. Help Hawaiʻi Craftsmen continue the sustainability and growth of its programs and events today by making a tax-deductible monetary contribution—however large or small— by sending us a check or contributing online.

DONATE HERE

Newsletter Call for Content

Is your work in an upcoming exhibit? Do you know of a lecture or event that might be of interest to our membership? Please let us know by sending an email to newsletter@hawaiicraftsmen.org by October 14th for inclusion in the next newsletter.

Request for Hawaii Craftsmen Historical Documents

Do you have any photographs, newspaper articles, program files, or other information from past Hawaii Craftsmen events? We would love to centralize our archives and fill in any missing holes in our history. Please contact us at info@hawaiicraftsmen or call us at (808) 521-3282.  

Volunteers Needed

As a volunteer organization, Hawaiʻi Craftsmen relies on the active participation of its members in volunteering for a wide range of tasks that help us deliver our programs to members and the community. Please consider volunteering as a coordinator or member on one of the following committees. To sign up to volunteer, please visit our volunteer web page.

MEMBERSHIP DRIVE COMMITTEE 

Committee members should have interest/experience in membership development and will assist in membership outreach, building greater active membership, and soliciting updates of member contact and interests information. 


VOLUNTEER COMMITTEE 

Committee members should have interest/experience in organizing volunteers; gathering data on volunteer skills, interests, and expertise; and working with program chairs and event coordinators to contact, solicit, and schedule volunteers. 


FUNDRAISING COMMITTEE 

Committee members should have an interest/experience in fundraising, particularly in working with donors and corporate sponsors. Members will be tasked with developing sponsorship packages, with outreach to potential donors and corporate sponsors, and with soliciting gifts in kind and/or monetary donations for programs and events. 

To sign up to volunteer, please visit our volunteer web page.


Board of Directors Nominations

The board is currently seeking nominations for the Vice President and Treasurer of the Board of Directors.  These positions require excellent leadership, organizational and people skills, as well as a strong understanding of fine craft arts. 

Please send your recommendations/nominations (self-nominations are welcome) and brief biographical information of potential candidates to president@hawaiicraftsmen.org 

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Tag us with your work-in-progress photos, your studio shots, your current shows, your inspirations! We’ll be happy to repost them on the IG page!


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Post upcoming shows & events you’d like to share, post a view from your studio, post questions for other members, and make connections :) We’ll help share those posts and get the word out.


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Board Meeting

Hawaii Craftsmen meets the Third Wednesday of the month and the meeting is open to members.  If you would like to attend, please sign up at Hawaiicraftsmen.org under Events or contact us to let us know you will be attending.

HAWAII CRAFTSMEN IS SUPPORTED BY THE HAWAI’I STATE FOUNDATION ON CULTURE AND THE ARTS,  THE HAWAII COMMUNITY FOUNDATION, THE ATHERTON FAMILY FOUNDATION, THE COOKE FOUNDATION, THE MCINERNY FOUNDATION, THE NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS, THE LAILA TWIGG-SMITH ART FUND, SEVERAL PRIVATE FAMILY FOUNDATIONS AND OUR MEMBERSHAWAI‘I CRAFTSMEN 1110 NUUANU AVE, HONOLULU, HI 96817info@hawaiicraftsmen.org • 808-521-3282

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