February 2019


Letter from the President

Aloha Hawai’i Craftsmen members,

On behalf of the board I would like to thank Ted Loberg and Maryann Liegh on the Maui as well as Patti Pease Johnson on Hawai’i island. They will be stepping down as Maui and Hawai’i island representatives respectively and I would like to thank them for their years of service to Hawai’i Craftsmen and for providing invaluable aid in coordinating our events. The efforts of our neighbor island members is what keeps us a statewide organization. The board is also honored to announce that Jennifer Owen will be replacing Ted and Maryanne as the Maui representative. Evan Jenkins will continue to represent Hawai’i Island. We are looking for a member to represent the Kona side of Hawai’i Island, if you are interested in becoming a representative please send me an email at:

president@hawaiicraftsmen.org

Aloha,

Mark Mitsuda

‘Aha Hana Lima 2019




THE RETURN OF BETH CAVENER

A THREE DAY INTERACTIVE DEMONSTRATION ... FEATURING HER LARGER THAN LIFE FIGURES

Four years ago many of you were treated to an Aha Hana Lima workshop featuring Beth Cavener. Hawai’i Craftsmen is excited to announce the return of Beth Cavener. In a slight departure from our usual Aha Hana Lima format, Beth will treat Hawai’i artists, collectors, and fans to her wildly popular 3-day interactive demonstration of the process and methodology she uses to create her larger than life ceramic sculptures. Using 600 lbs of clay and 25 feet of half inch pipe Beth will, working with the audience, construct one of her larger than life figures. Beth will also go over in detail from start to finish how she created some of her actual past works, including a 6 foot tall double figure piece constructed over the course of five months. Audience members will have the opportunity to try out some of her techniques as she guides members through a hands on exercise in her methods for sculpting an eye.

Beth’s sculptures focus on human psychology, stripped of context and rationalization, and articulated through animal and human forms. On the surface, these figures are simply feral and domestic individuals suspended in a moment of tension. Beneath the surface, they embody the consequences of human fear, apathy, aggression, and misunderstanding.

WORKSHOPS ON OAHU, THE BIG ISLAND AND MAUI IN APRIL

EARLY BIRD REGISTRATION IS OPEN UNTIL FEB 28TH

REGULAR REGISTRATION BEGINS MAR 1st 

PROSPECTUS

OAHU PUBLIC PRESENTATION & RECEPTION

University of Hawaii Manoa

Room: TBA

April 11, Thursday

Hours 6pm-8pm

Free


OAHU WORKSHOP

University of Hawaii Manoa

Art Building

2535 McCarthy Mall

Ceramics Department

Honolulu, HI 96822

April 12 evening (5pm-9pm), Friday

April 13 (9am-5pm), Saturday

April 14 (9am-5pm), Sunday

April 15 evening (5pm-9pm), Monday

Class Size 30

Registration Fee


HAWAI’I ISLAND PUBLIC PRESENTATION & RECEPTION

Volcano Arts Center

19-4074 Old Volcano Rd

Volcano, HI 96785

April 19, Friday

Hours 6pm-8pm

Free


HAWAI’I ISLAND WORKSHOP

Volcano Arts Center

19-4074 Old Volcano Rd

Volcano, HI 96785

April 19, 20, 21, Friday, Saturday, Sunday

Hours 9am-5pm

Class Size 30

Registration Fee


MAUI PUBLIC PRESENTATION & RECEPTION

University of Hawaii Maui College

Heona Art Building

310 W Kaahumanu Ave

Kahului, HI 96732

Free open to the public

April 25, Thursday

Hours 6pm-8pm

Free


MAUI WORKSHOP

University of Hawaii Maui College

Heona Art Building

310 W Kaahumanu Ave

Kahului, HI 96732

April 25, 26, 27, Friday, Saturday, Sunday

Hours 9am-5pm

Class Size 30

Facilities Use Fee


Some Changes Coming For Our Annual Exhibition

Aloha Hawai’i Craftsmen members,

We’ve been working hard on the upcoming exhibition for 2019, and I wanted give you advance notice about some changes to our schedule. But FIRST, I want to thank you again for making last year’s Annual Exhibition such a resounding success. Attendance was extraordinary at over 1,300 visitors for an average of 77.24 visitors a day. We got great press in the Star Advertiser, Hawai’i Public Radio, and Hawai’i News Now. And to top it off, sales of our member artist’s work was record breaking! Mahalo nui for working with us to help support the arts and fine craft in Hawai’i.

For 2019, we are thrilled to announce that our application to exhibit at Linekona was selected by the Museum of Art, and that HoMA is more committed than ever to help support Hawai’i Craftsmen and the community of artists in Hawai’i.

The Visible Hand: Hawai’i Craftsmen Annual Exhibition

August 30 - October 4, 2109

Honolulu Museum of Art School, Main Gallery

While we are still working out the exact dates (OMG, it’s complicated!), we expect registration to close around August 11, neighbor island jurying to happen sometime in the week of August 13-18, and O’ahu intake and jurying to happen around August 22-24. This is almost 2 months earlier than usual, so I wanted to let you know as soon as possible so you can start working on your next masterpieces!

We will send out an email with the exact dates and the prospectus as soon as it’s finalized, but if you have any questions at all, please don’t hesitate to ask. Thank you so much for your continued support and flexibility as we work through these changes.

Chris Edwards

Hawai’i Craftsmen Annual Exhibition Chair

christopheredwards@hawaiicraftsmen.org

Newsletter Call for Content

Is your work in an upcoming exhibit? Do you know of a lecture or event that might be of interest to our membership? Please let us know by sending an email to info@hawaiicraftsmen.org by December 14th for inclusion in the next newsletter.

“HAWAII CRAFTSMEN CELEBRATES FINE CRAFT AS A VITAL AND ENRICHING PART OF CONTEMPORARY LIFE AND SUPPORTS THE CREATIVE GROWTH OF OUR MEMBER ARTISTS AND THE EDUCATION OF THE GENERAL PUBLIC TO THE VALUE OF THE CRAFTS.” 

Laila Twigg-Smith Art Scholarship 2019


The scholarships (up to a maximum of $2,250 per individual) will support tuition, housing, meals and fees for Hawaii visual artists to attend the 2019 summer program at Penland School of Crafts(Penland, North Carolina).  Applicants must be a resident of the State of Hawaii, be a practicing artist, graduate, or undergraduate art student, and be accepted by the school for admission to its visual arts program.  Preference will be given to applicants with financial need.  Interested artists should apply directly to Penland per the contact details in the announcement. The deadline to apply for this scholarship is February 18th.

Exhibitions


FEBRUARY EXHIBIT IN THE WAIOLA CENTERʻS MAIN GALLERY

February’s exhibit in Wailoa Center’s Main Gallery is a remarkable display of elements depicting visual qualities of Hawaii’s landscape and culturally significant disciplines of craftsmanship. Hawaiian quilts will be on display by members of the group Kapa Apana o’Hilo, along with landscape oil paintings by local artist Steve Irvine. Completing the display, will be the private collection of Tandy Newsome, “Fit for a King” which will include twenty wood calabashes made out of Kou, Milo and Kamani by master carver Scott Hare. Artists from these three groups will be celebrated with a reception on Friday, February 1st from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.   

In 1970, Doris Nosaka, master Kapa quilter, had several kapas on display at Kulana Naau'au.  She saw there was an interest in the sewing of kapas, so she started the club:  Kapa Apana o'Hilo (Hawaiian quilt club of Hilo).  Fast forward forty-nine years later, the club is very active and invites new members to meetings which are held on the first Saturdays of the month in Hilo, and now at Keaau Community Center.  Members of the community who are interested are invited to attend meetings, where they will be helped in choosing patterns, and obtaining directions for fabric sizes and directions in folding, cutting and sewing, and quilting the patterns.  Patterns are available- pillow, small blankets to king size blankets, wall hangings. The quilters who will have their quilts on display in the exhibit are Laura Ashton, Yoko Brown, Cathy Correia, Noriko Fujii, Myra Ingbino-Lewis, Vicki Kury, Merci Manalili, Carol Niimi, Mariko Ogawara, Taeko Ogawa Scott, Misako Shoemaker, Patricia Walters, Deborah Warren and Julie Wheeler.

Steve Irvine, born in Los Angeles in 1952 was raised in California's South Bay beach towns. He moved to Hawai'i in 1969 to surf the North Shore and attend college, in that order! In 1983, Steve received a BA in Liberal Studies, specializing in Fine Arts. Active in the East Hawai`i art scene, his work has been featured in several of the annual juried Spring and Fall Arts Exhibits at Wailoa Center and the East Hawai`i Cultural Center, since 1986. He has served as president of the Big Island Art Guild in 1988, and was on the board of directors of the East Hawai`i Cultural Council from 1990 to 2000. In 1998, Steve Irvine was awarded “Best of Show” by the juror, Frank Romero, an internationally renowned Hispanic artist. Steve organized a group show, “The Hawai'i Five” in 2000, and a solo show in 2002 for Romero’s Los Angeles gallery. He has had three exhibits at the Volcano Art Center in 2004, 2009, and most recently in 2018. Steve's work also was acquisitioned by the Hawai'i State Foundation on Culture and Arts for their permanent collection. Over the years, Steve has worked in many mediums, from printmaking to oil pastels, and multi-media paintings utilizing resin. His current body of work consists of oil paintings, with landscapes and still life as subject matter. Steve Irvine likes to “find the miraculous in the mundane”, to express tropical heat through the use of strong color contrasts, and to define form with light rather than outlines. Irvine will have 18 paintings on display interspersed with the quilts.

“Fit for a King” a collection of Kou, Milo and Kamani calabashes created by Scott Hare is a work of deep commitment and fine craftsmanship. Hare is, by his own admission, laid back and is not into self-promotion but is passionate and knowledgeable when it comes to his art. Hare states “The kou calabashes represent the absolute beauty of the wood combined with functionality. The wood is extremely stable and does not contain a lot of oils or tannic acid, like koa wood, which has a lot of tannic acid that tends to make food sour. Milo was the other wood used for calabashes. It also is quite stable and beautiful. Both were used for food as well as storage for things such as leis and capes. The large kou bowls were mostly reserved for the alii and royalty.    I am a carver and sculptor by trade yet these are the pieces that my wife Tandy has wanted to save for our family. It is the beautiful forms that show the grain of the kou wood.  The trees are not in danger of extinction; however, the tradition of having these calabashes keeps woodworkers always on the hunt.  The current scarcity of these woods is mostly caused by not planting for the future. Red spider mites and gypsy moths also add as a pest to the trees.  I personally have acquired the wood for the pieces in this show through salvage or natural disaster events. Some wood came from Kapoho, Pohoiki, Puako, Honomolino and Maui.” Each calabash has a story which Hare knows well and will be described and identified in the exhibit.

 

Wailoa Center is a Division of State Parks, Department of Land and Natural Resources. It is free and opened to the public Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The Center is closed on Saturdays, Sundays and State Holidays. For additional information please call 933-0416 or emailwailoa@yahoo.com. You may also visit wailoacenter.com


COSMIC CHARACTERS: WOOD PUPPETS OF ASIA

JANUARY 20 - MAY 5, 2019
EAST-WEST CENTER GALLERY, HONOLULU, HAWAI‘I
FREE ADMISSION, OPEN TO THE PUBLIC



Exhibition Gala Opening

Sunday, January 20, 2:00-3:30 p.m.

Reception, gallery walkthrough with the curators, and special Wayang Golek Panji performance by Dr. Kathy Foley with musical accompaniment by I Made Widana and Oriana Filiaci

Puppet theatre presents the entire cosmos through character, color, story, sound, and movement. Distinct traditions are found throughout the Asia Pacific region, many of which have been influenced by shamanism, animism, Hinduism, and Buddhism. Local folklore is also incorporated and puppet performances are closely related to human dance-drama and mask dances. In many Asia Pacific cultures, puppeteers are associated with unseen, mystical, and divine powers as they animate a whole world created in miniature. This exhibition focuses on the three-dimensional wood puppets that demonstrate the following techniques: string puppets (marionettes), rod (stick) puppets, and glove (hand) puppets.

Through these performance forms stories come to life including the Hindu epics of the Mahabharata and the Ramayana, Buddhist Jataka stories, and the chronicles and well-known Monkey King novel found in Chinese theatre traditions, as well as local folk stories. Indonesian puppetry also tells the arrival of Islam to Indonesia through the story of Amir Hamzah. Many of these puppet traditions are historically related to the royal courts, while other performances are derived from village performances. Even with roots in the royal courts, puppet performance is intended for the common people, instilling, re-informing, and enriching their lives with locally-based cultural values and beliefs. Puppet performance in Asia is appreciated and enjoyed by diverse audiences — from children to elders — with entertaining elements ranging from slapstick humor to deep, rich life philosophies and religious teachings.

More than 10 unique traditions from India, Sri Lanka, Myanmar, Thailand, Indonesia, Vietnam, China, Taiwan, Korea, and Japan are displayed. To honor our host culture, Hawaiian puppets are featured as well. These performance traditions are a place of intersection — a bridge between the past, present, and future — where the divine and human worlds meet and ancient stories are made relevant for the contemporary experience.



*****
Guided exhibition tours are offered Sundays at 3:00 p.m.



Special Events:
In the EWC Gallery with free admission, open seating, no reservations



Sunday, January 27, 2:00–3:00 p.m. 
Illustrated Talk: “The Living Hula Ki‘i: Hawaiian Puppetry” by Aulii Mitchell, Kumu Hula of Halau o Kahiwahiwa and Cultural Anthropologist/Advisor for Cultural Surveys Hawai‘i Inc.



Sunday, February 24, 2:00–3:00 p.m. 
Illustrated Talk: “45 Years as a Puppeteer” by Dr. Michael Schuster, East-West Center Gallery Curator



Sunday,March 31, 2:00–3:00 p.m. 
Illustrated Talk: “Puppetry in Iran” by photographer, director, and actor Maseeh Ganjali



Sunday, April 7, 2:00–3:00 p.m. 
Illustrated Talk: “Holding Infinity in the Palm, Wayang Potehi: Chinese Glove Puppet Theatre in Indonesia” by Yuan-Hsin Tung, PhD student in Ethnomusicology, UH Mānoa, EWC student



Sunday, April 28, 2:00–3:00 p.m. 
Illustrated Talk: “From Stage Adaptation to Educational Outreach: Balinese Shadow Theatre Performance in Hawai‘i” by Dr. Kirstin Pauka, Professor of Theatre, UH Mānoa; Nezia Azmi, Affiliate Consultant, CWEAS; and Dr. Annie Reynolds, EWC Arts Program Assistant



Saturday, May 4, 2:00–3:30 p.m. 
Puppet Making Workshop (inspired by Bunraku Japanese doll puppets) with Dmitri Carter, Director, Northwest Puppet Center. *Registration required, inquire for details at arts@eastwestcenter.org



Sunday, May 5, 2:00–3:00 p.m. 
Illustrated Talk: “An Introduction to Festival Karakuri in Japan” by Dmitri Carter



*****
East-West Center Gallery
John A. Burns Hall
1601 East-West Road (corner Dole St. & East-West Rd.)
Gallery admission is free

Open Weekdays 8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m. and Sundays Noon–4:00 p.m.
Closed Saturdays and Jan. 21, Feb. 18, & Apr. 21

Visitor parking is available on the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa campus for a fee during the week, and is normally free and ample on Sundays. Parking info: http://manoa.hawaii.edu/commuter/parking.html

Free school and group tours available. Contact: arts@eastwestcenter.org

For more information:
http://arts.EastWestCenter.org/
arts@EastWestCenter.org
Facebook and Instagram: @EWC.arts 
808-944-7177

http://arts.EastWestCenter.org


JAMIE ALLEN AND LICIA McDONALD AT HAWAI‘I STATE ART MUSEUM GALLERY (HiSAM x Mori)

Friday, February 1, 6-9pm
Hawaii State Art Museum, 250 South Hotel St.

Pop Up: Andrew Mau (mau-house.com) the creator of Island Boy (@islandboy.shop) will sell cut flowers grown from various farms and gardens from the islands.

Fashion Show: Barrio Vintage will be debuting a carefully curated collection of vintage clothing that he has put aside for the last 4 years.  Starts around 7 pm.  (barriovintage.com, @barriovintage) 

Music: by Page. good energy beats. @Pagehnl

Drinks and Food: cash bar and menu provided by the cafe. 



MAILE ANDRADE: KA ‘OPUA Ā HINA

OCTOBER 11, 2018 - MARCH 24, 2019 
HONOLULU MUSEUM OF ART



Mixed media artist Maile Andrade transforms the John Dominis and Patches Damon Holt Arts of Hawaiʻi Gallery using wauke, or mulberry bark, as her primary material in this solo exhibition.

Andrade’s studio practice is informed by her time spent researching and reactivating the kapa-making process. A Hawaiian customary textile of pounded wauke, or mulberry bark, kapa was methodically stretched, sometimes decorated, and often layered to function as garments, wraps, and blankets before the introduction of cotton fabrics. In the 19th century, kapa production waned as the Native Hawaiian population drastically decreased. However, a cultural resurgence during the 1970s Hawaiian Renaissance revived ancient practices such as ocean navigation by the stars, hula, oli (chant), and mele (music). Kapa-making, weaving, and the growing and gathering of organic materials surfaced as important artistic pursuits—and as pro-Hawaiʻi political statements. A decade later in 1981, Andrade joined the contemporary artists and practitioners who took up the production of Hawaiian material culture using customary methods as an extension of the Hawaiian Renaissance.

Andrade channels the material and methods of kapa into an immersive installation as she reimagines the elemental manifestations of Hina. A divine kapa-maker, the Goddess Hina produced such fine kapa that the clouds in the sky were described as examples of her work. Andrade’s gallery installation concentrates on the idea that, like Hina, we have the ability to affect change within our environment. Ka ‘Opua Ā Hina features wauke pounded by the artist to the moʻomoʻo phase. That is, the material has undergone preliminary rounds of soaking, felting, and drying, priming it for handling yet keeping it flexible enough to continue into the later stages of kapa production post-exhibition. Resourceful and sustainable, Andrade’s practice merges 21st century contemporary art priorities with the radical possibilities of Hawaiian material culture.

Four kapa dating to the 18th and 19th centuries from our collection are on view in adjacent galleries. Together with Andrade’s installation, these textiles span a period of 200 years and indicate the continuity and evolutionary use of wauke.





JAPANESE URUSHI + ETTORE SOTTSASS

PANTHEON CONTEMPORARY
1121 NUUANU ST. SUITE 105,
HONOLULU, HI. 96817
DECEMBER 11, 2018 ­- FEBRUARY 26, 2019


Gallery hours: Tuesday + Wednesday are appointment only
Thursday - Saturday 12:00pm - 6:00pm (open to the public)

First Friday gallery visiting hours:
January 4, 2019
February 1, 2019
exhibit remains open from 6:00pm - 9:30pm

The Pantheon Contemporary of the Hawaii Theatre Centre is proud to present its first international exhibition, Japanese Urushi and Ettore Sottsass. The exhibit showcases 22 unique works of urushi made by urushi craftsmen in Japan. The craftsmen worked together across the regions of Wakasa, Echizen, Kyoto, and Wajima to create each piece. The exhibition will not only highlight the amazing workmanship of Japanese Urushi lacquer, but also incorporate the collaboration of legendary Italian architect and designer, Ettore Sottsass (b.1917­- d.2007).

Known for his distinctive approach to design and architecture, Ettore Sottsass discovered Japanese Urushi near the end of his life. It was the wet sparkle on each surface that he fell in love with. He was already more than 80 years old before he started making and designing Urushi lacquer. We believe that visitors who see this exhibition in Hawaii will be impressed by Japanese lacquerware that Ettore Sottsass fell in love with.

In celebration of the 150th anniversary of Japanese immigration to Hawaii, this exhibition is one of the most important cultural exchanges to take place between Hawaii and Japan.

This exhibition is presented under the auspices of the Consulate General of Japan in Honolulu. We are honored by the Consul General Mr. Koichi Ito and Mrs. Ito who will be present at the opening reception.

About the Hawaii Theatre and Pantheon Contemporary

The historic Hawaii Theatre Center is located in one of the oldest Chinatowns in the U.S. Nestled in the heart of Downtown Honolulu, the Theatre has been popular with locals and tourists since 1922 as a place of cultural enrichment and performing arts and was restored through the support of the community in 1996.

Four years earlier in 1918, the Pantheon Saloon opened at 1129 Nuuanu, the once oldest continually operating bar in Hawaii. Today, the memory of this once historic saloon where King Kalakaua often entertained guest, the Hawaii Theater Center transformed the space to showcase art. In commemoration of 100 years of Pantheon Saloon, the Theatre adopted the namesake Pantheon Contemporary with the purpose to bring more diverse design mediums and classic practices into the Arts and Culture District of Honolulu.

For more information please email info@honoluluexhibitions.com 


Opportunities

OLA KA ‘IILIMA ARTSPACE LOFTS IN KAKA‘AKO

 
Ola Ka ‘Ilima Artspace Lofts will provide 84 units of affordable live-work apartments for artists, artisans, and culture bearers. Amenities include a large outdoor courtyard for community events, community workrooms, a community kitchen, playground, and gardening areas. There is also ground floor commercial with 4,600 square feet for the PA‘I Arts and Culture Center with Kumu Vicky Takamine Holt and another 2,100 square feet for another arts focused business yet to be identified.
 
Ola Ka ‘Ilima Artspace Lofts will serve artists, artisans, and culture bearers who earn between 30% and 60% of area median income as defined by HUD. We are funded through the Low Income Housing Tax Credit program.
 
Ola Ka ‘Ilima Artspace Lofts is under construction in the Kaka‘ako neighborhood of Honolulu. Applications for housing become available December 17,2018, are due January 22, 2019, and expected move in begins May 2019. 

Artspace is a national organization with a mission to create, foster, and preserve affordable and sustainable space for artists and arts organizations. We have completed over 50 projects.  https://www.artspace.org.   https://www.artspace.org/hawaii
 
Contact: Julie Alexander, Asset Manager, Artspace
Cell: 206-355-7194
250 Third Avenue North, Suite 400, Minneapolis, MN 55401
julie.alexander@artspace.org





THE ART IN THE EVERYDAY COMMUNITY QUILT PROJECT

Call For Participation

The Art In The Everyday Community Quilt Project has arrived at the University of Hawaii Maui College.

Installed over the 2018 holidays in the Atrium in the University of Hawaii Maui College Library.  The Library and the school are undertaking a campus wide participation campaign to enlarge the project - while the visiting artist continues the facilitation of remote participation from the community, other islands and the mainland.

The Participation Packets for Maui inclusion, can be picked up and dropped off at the Library front desk - or - if you are not a student or faculty, you participation piece can be requested via email and returned to the visiting artist's studio via mail.

For inclusion in this leg of the Project all pieces must be returned by April 1st 2019.

ABOUT THE PROJECT - HOW TO CONTEMPLATE THE EVERYDAY FOR THE PROJECT - QUESTIONS YOU MAY HAVE:

Art is Everywhere - Challenge yourself by asking where do I see art? pattern? concept? design? new ideas? in the things right in front of me.

What does the everyday mean to you? do you walk the same path? wake up and do the same thing? The documentation and contemplation of that can be one of the first doors of creative thinking - many conceptual and creative based performance work is based on simple tasks - Martha Rosler - The Semiotics Of the Kitchen - Marta Minujin - Reading The News -  Rikrkrit Tiravanaija Untitled (Free/Still)  etc. Even the visiting artist's own performance based piece A Stitch In Time.

Many things we use everyday have been designed through creative thinking - by people in careers not recognized as creative - things such as dental flossers, paper cups and their holders, thread, needles and so on.  This project is designed to celebrate those things and demonstrate how careers not traditionally thought of as creative and adding a creative component to our daily lives.

Through the manifestation of these thoughts the visiting artist also hope to draw attention to not only the beauty in the everyday but draw attention to waste and facilitate thinking about objects before us by recycling them into art.

University of Hawaii Maui College 301 Kaahumanu Ave., Kahului, HI 96732

Faculty contact: Gwen Arkin

Visiting Artist Laura Phelps Rogers Studio 3240 Larimer St., Denver, CO 80205

email: lauraphelpsrogers@hotmail.com


Members, do we have your Current Information ?

We are making sure that we have all members' current contact information to keep everyone informed and up to date on Hawaii Craftsmen events and opportunities. We are also tracking members' preferred art medium to help us make decisions about what programs to provide. Please take the time to sign in at Hawaiicraftsmen.org, update your contact information, and adjust your membership level or status as needed, so we can serve you better!

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Support Hawaiʻi Craftsmen Today

For 50 years, Hawaiʻi Craftsmen has relied on the generosity of members, supporters, and volunteers like you, who have helped us accomplish our mission to serve as an integral part of the fine craft community, promote fine crafts throughout the state, and support our community of member artists. Help Hawaiʻi Craftsmen continue the sustainability and growth of its programs and events today by making a tax-deductible monetary contribution—however large or small— by sending us a check or contributing online.

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Request for Hawaii Craftsmen Historical Documents

Do you have any photographs, newspaper articles, program files, or other information from past Hawaii Craftsmen events? We would love to centralize our archives and fill in any missing holes in our history. Please contact us at info@hawaiicraftsmen or call us at (808) 521-3282.  

Volunteers Needed

As a volunteer organization, Hawaiʻi Craftsmen relies on the active participation of its members in volunteering for a wide range of tasks that help us deliver our programs to members and the community. Please consider volunteering as a coordinator or member on one of the following committees. To sign up to volunteer, please visit our volunteer web page.

MEMBERSHIP DRIVE COMMITTEE 

Committee members should have interest/experience in membership development and will assist in membership outreach, building greater active membership, and soliciting updates of member contact and interests information. 


VOLUNTEER COMMITTEE 

Committee members should have interest/experience in organizing volunteers; gathering data on volunteer skills, interests, and expertise; and working with program chairs and event coordinators to contact, solicit, and schedule volunteers. 


FUNDRAISING COMMITTEE 

Committee members should have an interest/experience in fundraising, particularly in working with donors and corporate sponsors. Members will be tasked with developing sponsorship packages, with outreach to potential donors and corporate sponsors, and with soliciting gifts in kind and/or monetary donations for programs and events. 

To sign up to volunteer, please visit our volunteer web page.

Board of Directors Nominations

The board is currently seeking nominations for the Vice President and Treasurer of the Board of Directors.  These positions require excellent leadership, organizational and people skills, as well as a strong understanding of fine craft arts. 

Please send your recommendations/nominations (self-nominations are welcome) and brief biographical information of potential candidates to president@hawaiicraftsmen.org 

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Board Meeting

Hawaii Craftsmen meets the Third Wednesday of the month and the meeting is open to members.  If you would like to attend, please sign up at Hawaiicraftsmen.org under Events or contact us to let us know you will be attending.

HAWAII CRAFTSMEN IS SUPPORTED BY THE HAWAI’I STATE FOUNDATION ON CULTURE AND THE ARTS,  THE HAWAII COMMUNITY FOUNDATION, THE ATHERTON FAMILY FOUNDATION, THE COOKE FOUNDATION, THE MCINERNY FOUNDATION, THE NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS, THE LAILA TWIGG-SMITH ART FUND, SEVERAL PRIVATE FAMILY FOUNDATIONS AND OUR MEMBERSHAWAI‘I CRAFTSMEN 1110 NUUANU AVE, HONOLULU, HI 96817info@hawaiicraftsmen.org • 808-521-3282

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