ʻAHA HANA LIMA 2017

Gathering of the Crafts is an annual series of intensive 3-day hands-on workshops and lectures exploring various media: clay, metal, wood, fiber or glass and usually conducted by artist-craftsmen from outside Hawaii. 

The Maui Daniel Essig workshop and lecture have been cancelled.

Photos from the workshops

<< All album photos 2/99 photos

Matt Szösz

Glass 


Dan Essig

Mixed Media 


Lisa Klakulak

Fiber 


Oahu Slide Lecture & Reception

Oahu Public Lecture & Reception with
Matt Szösz, Dan Essig and 
Lisa Klakulak

Thursday March 16th 5:30-7:30

Please join us for a Presentation, Q&A and Reception.

Free to the Public

Media Contact
mmitsuda@punahou.edu

Location

Luke Lecture Hall
Wo international Center
Punahou School  
1601 Punahou St
Honolulu, Hawaii 96822

Matt Szösz


Born in Rhode Island, Matthew Szösz 
approaches materials with an innate impulse to alter, build, and investigate. As an artist using glass as his primary medium, he creates performance-based experiments, and the resulting works have been unexpected and boundary-pushing. Says Szösz, “Many of my works start from a basis of ‘un-likeliness.’” He has received a BFA, a BID (Industrial Design), and a MFA (Glass) from Rhode Island School of Design. He has worked professionally in art and art related fields in Rhode Island, New Mexico and California for the last twelve years. He was an Emerging Artist in Residence at Pilchuck in 2007, and a Wheaton Fellow in 2008. In 2009 he was an artist in residence at Nagoya Institute for the Arts and taught a workshop at Toyama Glass Institute. He won the 2009 Jutta Cuny-Franz Memorial Award, becoming the second American ever to do so. More recently he has been the Craftsperson in Residence at Virginia Commonwealth University and a Proctor Fellow at Australia National University. In 2010 he founded Hyperopia Projects, a curatorial organization for the promotion of experimental and cross-genre work. In 2011 he was the Executive Director of Public Glass, a San Francisco non-profit, and was a Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation Grant Winner. In 2012, he completed residencies at the Toledo Museum of Art, Canberra Glassworks, and the Danish Royal Academy, Bornholm and was selected by the Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian Institution as one of the top young Craft artists in America for their exhibition 40 under 40. During his 2014 Residency at The Studio, Szösz investigated the intersection of glass, sound, and culture. Through the construction of glass instruments—“or at least sound-producing objects”—he focused on creating sounds both pre-planned and discovered in the moment during the investigations. Through the construction of glass and discovered in the moment during the investigations.

Matthew Szösz - untitled (inflatable) no. 71

Matthew Szösz 

Matthew Szösz - Snare

Matt Szösz Oahu Workshop #1

Out of the Box

Maximum enrollment 14 

$60 lab fee + Tuition

Workshop half day
Friday March 17th 5pm-9pm

Workshop full day
SaturdaySunday March 18th,19th 9am-5pm

Media Contact
mmitsuda@punahou.edu

Registration Closes March 13th, 9am

Supply List 

Location

Castle Arts Center
Punahou School 
 
1601 Punahou St
Honolulu, Hawaii 96822

This class will focus on using the fusing kiln as platform for hands on working of warm glass. Students will be shown techniques for building flexible, inflatable or un-foldable structures in flat glass, and how to successfully manipulate them at temperature. Students will also be encouraged to develop their own methods for the manipulation of warm glass, and for construction and assembly of associated forms, tools and jigs. 

This will expand skill sets and possibilities in radical new ways, and open whole new areas for artist/ student exploration. Experimentation and innovation, as well as performative possibilities of the techniques, will be discussed and encouraged. 

Matt Szösz Oahu Workshop #2

Out of the Box

Maximum enrollment 14 

$60 lab fee + Tuition

Workshop half day
Friday March 24th 5pm-9pm

Workshop full day
SaturdaySunday March 25th, 26th 9am-5pm

Media Contact
mmitsuda@punahou.edu

Registration Closes March 20th, 9am

Supply List 


Location

Castle Arts Center
Punahou School  
1601 Punahou St
Honolulu, Hawaii 96822

This class will focus on using the fusing kiln as platform for hands on working of warm glass. Students will be shown techniques for building flexible, inflatable or un-foldable structures in flat glass, and how to successfully manipulate them at temperature. Students will also be encouraged to develop their own methods for the manipulation of warm glass, and for construction and assembly of associated forms, tools and jigs. 

This will expand skill sets and possibilities in radical new ways, and open whole new areas for artist/ student exploration. Experimentation and innovation, as well as performative possibilities of the techniques will be discussed and encouraged. 

Dan Essig

Daniel Essig was born in St Louis Missouri, studied at Southern Illinois University, Penland School and the University of Iowa. Nineteen years ago he moved to Asheville, North Carolina where he has maintained a full time studio at Grovewood Gallery.  Daniel Essig lectures and offers workshops at book centers, craft schools, colleges, artist retreats as well as privately. Dan has created wooden and sculpture books for over 25 years.  He is a recipient of the North Carolina Artist Fellowship Grant. Daniel exhibits his work nationally and is in numerous private and public collections. Recently his work has been collected by the Smithsonian Renwick Museum, University of California Santa Cruz, McHenry Library, Special Collections and the Topeka Public library.   Many of Daniel’s sculptural pieces are featured in The Penland Book of Handmade Books. 


Artist Statement

Some people use my books as journals and fill them up with words. I don't write in my books. For me, the books themselves are journals, visual records of my life and work.

I am interested in traces of the past, ancient binding styles, reliquaries, distressed finishes, and found objects. Since I was six or seven years old, I've been collecting small objects. I have seashells and interesting rocks that I collected at the beach on childhood vacations I've stored up seedpods, rocks, bones, shells, bits of rusty metal, nails, animal teeth, fossils. They represent periods in my life, even just days or moments. I keep my collection of relics in drawers, bottles, and boxes within a single small room in my house. The space has the feel of a German Wunderkammer, a "cabinet of curiosities."

I often sit in the room and scan my collection, seeking just the right object to inspire a new book or sculpture.

A symphony conductor who collects my work once told me that he hides my books in a basket every evening before going to bed so they won't be stolen during the night. Until fairly recently all books were prized possessions -- medieval libraries chained books to the shelves to prevent theft. In those days each volume was crafted with precision, elaborately decorated and embellished with precious stones and metals. I aim to make my books just as precious as those medieval manuscripts.

Most my work has a Coptic book at its heart. The binding was first used in the fourth century, in Ethiopia.

I became interested in the healing aspects that the books played within this culture which led in turn to a fascination with the magical and healing properties employed in both Reliquaries and N’Kisi N’konde figures.

danielessig.com




Dan Essig Oahu Workshop

Wooden Covers, Mica Pages

Maximum Enrollment 12 students


$53 lab fee + Tuition


Workshop half day 

Friday March 17th 5pm-9pm

Workshop full day 

Saturday, Sunday March 18th, 19th 9am-5pm 

Contact Sharon Doughtie
leaf@hawaii.rr.com

Registration Closes March 13th, 9am

Supply List 

Location

Castle Arts Center
Punahou School  
1601 Punahou St
Honolulu, Hawaii 96822

Developed as early as the fourth century, this Ethiopian binding style has withstood the test of time. The elegant sewing structure, combined with the use of traditional wooden covers and alternative mica pages, opens a wide range of possibilities for both the beginner and the advanced bookbinder. Using a variety of tools, both manual and power you will drill, shape, and smooth your book covers.  For the pages we will use a combination of paper and plate mica.  The mica is a material designed for lamp shades, but also works well as an element in book arts and collage.  Finishing includes sealing your wooden covers with milk paint and a coating of wax as well as adding a leather closure.  As time allows, Daniel will share various features he includes in his own bindings and sculptural books.

Lisa Klakulak

Lisa Klakulak’s creativity was nurtured at a young age by her mother’s arts, good public-school art programs in the suburbs of Detroit, and classes at the local art association. With these foundational experiences as well as self-directed exploration in fabric dyeing, sewing, and off-loom bead weaving, Klakulak began her BFA studies in 1993 at the University of Colorado. During her college years, she exhibited sculptural beaded jewelry at local art cooperatives and independently pursued the study of natural dyes, graduating in 1997 from Colorado State with a BFA in Fiber Arts. Klakulak relocated to Taos, NM to work as the chief natural dyer for a fiber supplier and began selling her work at Fine Art and Craft Shows. International travels over the millenium intensified Klakulak’s textile focus, motivating her move to the southeast to study at Penland School of Craft and to accept an Artist-in-Residence position at The Appalachian Center for Craft, in Smithville, TN. While at ACC from 2002-2005, Klakulak extensively explored the medium of felt, educated children in middle Tennessee public schools through ACC’s Outreach Programs, began instructing adult workshops and acquired a K-12 Visual Arts certification. Klakulak, now residing in Asheville, NC, creates wearable textiles, accessories and non-functional sculpture as well as instructs workshops worldwide. She pursues opportunities to work with children to integrate fiber art into the visual art curriculum and to raise cultural awareness and appreciation by way of her international travels.




Lisa Klakulak Oahu Workshop

Resist-Based Pendants: Hollow Forms and Object Entrapment

Limit 10 Students 

$25 lab fee to be paid to instructor
+ Tuition


Workshop half day 
Friday March 17th 5pm-9pm
Workshop full day 
SaturdaySunday March 18th, 19th 9am-5pm

Media Contact
Liz Train
lizabethtrain@hotmail.com

Registration Closes March 13th, 9am

Supply List

Location

University of Hawaii at Manoa
University of Hawaii at Manoa Art Department
2535 McCarthy Mall Room 306
Honolulu, Hawai’i 96822

Intermediate: participants should have experience with wet felting wool fiber

Maximum student enrollment of 10 participants

Explore multiple three-dimensional techniques for small-scale object development by way of employing resists to keep specified areas from felting together including a bail for hanging. Study how the relationship of the weight of wool fibers to the area of layout determines the sizeof hollow forms and the quality of the felt. Sculpt unique hollow forms by modifying the density of fiber layout by incorporating shapes of partially felted wool. Additionally, learn to entrap a durable found object in a thin, high shrinkage felt skin and cut away specified areas to reveal the objects color, texture and material complexity of your chosen object.

Approx $25 USD Material Fee (to be paid to instructor): Moroccan olive oil soap, Merino wool, needles and thread, resist material, agitation mat, razor

Student Materials to Bring: a collection of 2-5 objects no larger than 3” and no smaller than 1” in any direction made from material that won’t break down when wet/soapy and agitated (rubber, plastic, wood, rock, shell, glass, non-rusting metal, etc), 1 piece of small bubbled bubble wrap measuring 12” x 30”, 12” of a foam swimming pool noodle or PVC pipe 1”-2” in diameter, a pair of waist high nylons, a dish or small bucket for holding water (approx. 6”h x 5”w), a couple hand towels, small sharp scissors, a note pad and writing utensils, a calculator, a measuring tape

Not mandatory to bring, but helpful: hand carders for blending colors, a small 18mm rotary cutter and cutting mat (instructor will have these items for sale), a digital scale measuring to an accuracy of .0 or .00 grams (purchase at http://www.oldwillknottscales.com/pocket-miniscale.html)

Lisa Klakulak Kauai Workshop

Solid Form Felting Techniques

Limit 10 students

$30 lab fee to be paid to instructor
+ Tuition

Workshop half day 
Friday March 24th 5pm-9pm
Workshop full day
Saturday, 
Sunday March 25th, 26th 9am-5pm

Media Contact

Mark Mitsuda
mmitsuda@punahou.edu

Registration Closes March 20th, 9am

Supply List

Location

Kauai Society of Artists
Kukui Grove Center
3-2600 Kaumaulii Hwy
Lihue, HI 96766

All levels

Maximum student enrollment of 10 participants

Explore solid felt forms of spheres, discs, barrels, cones, hoops and cords. Learn graceful connection techniques for wet felting these basic forms together for making more complex clasps, hinges and undulating cords applicable for adornment, wearable closures and/or sculptural elements. Learn the appropriate tension and crosshatched preparation for dry wrapping and needle felting when preparing solid forms for wet felting. This technical sequence provides sample air space for shrinkage resulting in well-integrated surfaces that won't pill! Additionally, explore the integration of partially felted shapes in the dry preparation to create more defined edges and intriguing shapes by providing specific areas of greater felt density.

Approx $30 USD Material Fee (to be paid to instructor): Moroccan olive oil soap, Merino wool, agitation mat, single replaceable 40 star needle tool & foam, skewer, razor

Student Materials to Bring: a dish or small bucket for holding water (approx. 6”h x 5”w), a couple hand towels, small sharp scissors, a disposable shaving razor (preferably with two blades and no moisture strip-look in the men’s razor section), a note pad and writing utensils, a calculator, a measuring tape

Not mandatory to bring, but helpful: hand carders for blending colors, a small 18mm rotary cutter and cutting mat (instructor will have these items for sale), a digital scale measuring to an accuracy of .0 or .00 grams (purchase at http://www.oldwillknottscales.com/pocket-miniscale.html)

Lisa Klakulak Kauai Lecture & Reception

Public Lecture

Thursday March 23rd 5:30-7:30

Please join us for a Presentation, Q&A and Reception.

Free to the Public

Media Contact
Mark Mitsuda
mmitsuda@punahou.edu

Register Here

Location

Kauai Society of Artists
Kukui Grove Center
3-2600 Kaumaulii Hwy
Lihue, HI 96766

Tuition & Facilities use Information

Tuition Fees ( per workshop) Oahu & Kauai

Non-Member $350, Member $275, Student (W/ID) $150

Facilities Fee Maui

Non-Member $350, Member $275, Student (W/ID) $150 

LAB FEES ARE ESTIMATES AND ARE NOT EXPECTED TO INCREASE, HOWEVER STUDENTS WILL BE NOTIFIED OF REQUIRED TOOLS AND/OR MATERIALS AND SHOULD BE PREPARED TO SUPPORT EXTRA FEES AS EXPENSES WARRANT 

Student Scholarships

Applications are now closed.

A limited number of student scholarships are available.

Applicant must be a full-time undergraduate or graduate student and a current Hawai'i Craftsmen member. Please download the Stella O.H. Lee Scholarship Application Form for more details.


HAWAII CRAFTSMEN IS SUPPORTED BY THE HAWAI’I STATE FOUNDATION ON CULTURE AND THE ARTS,  THE HAWAII COMMUNITY FOUNDATION, THE ATHERTON FAMILY FOUNDATION, THE COOKE FOUNDATION, THE MCINERNY FOUNDATION, THE NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS, THE LAILA TWIGG-SMITH ART FUND, SEVERAL PRIVATE FAMILY FOUNDATIONS AND OUR MEMBERSHAWAI‘I CRAFTSMEN 1110 NUUANU AVE, HONOLULU, HI 96817info@hawaiicraftsmen.org • 808-521-3282

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